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Judge Faith of Divorce Court shares ways couples can better handle stress

A lot of couples find that the holidays can bring about as much stress as it can joy (especially this year in the present economy) and it can be tempting to take out that frustration verbally on those closest to you, but there are ways to make things easier.

Here’s more with Entertainment Insider McKinzie Roth and Judge Faith Jenkins, star of Divorce Court.

  1. We’re all human and we can all get frustrated by what’s happening around us but learn to distinguish your feelings from the facts and when your partner is feeling stressed come from a place of understanding & support.
  2. Set some boundaries and know that it’s OK to say no. Your feelings are valid too. Be kind to yourself. This may be the year you finally tell your mother in law you don’t want to make a Fruit Cake (you don’t even like fruit cake!). It’s about effectively communicating your truth.
  3. At the same time, pick your battles. You don’t have to always be right. You can’t change how other people act but you can change your response. There are times where you have to let some things go for the sake of peace.
  4. Don’t lose sight of what really counts. This year has taught us life is precious and our time is golden. For as many couples who have struggled this year because the time they’ve spent “stuck in the house” together has exacerbated issues — there are others who’ve used this time to fortify the foundation of their relationship. There are people who are spending the holidays alone this year and they don’t get be with family – if you’re fortunate enough to be with your loved ones, appreciate it.

Divorce Court began as a dramatized court show in 1957, but later and presently is an arbitration-based reality court show. The program is nontraditional within the judicial genre as it mostly resolves the disputes of couples facing the end of their relationship. It has been presided over by many television personalities: former Cleveland Heights Municipal Court Judge Lynn Toler and Judge Mablean Ephraim and currently, Judge Faith Jenkins. Divorce Court is produced by Lincolnwood Drive, Inc. and distributed by Fox First Run. Divorce Court is the longest-running program in the legal courtroom genre, and of the shows now airing in the genre, is the oldest. It has been revived more than any other court show: the series has lived three lives in first-run syndication: from 1957 to 1969, from 1985 to 1992, and the current iteration, since 1999. Unlike the show’s previous lives which portrayed standard court cases with opening and closing arguments and attorneys representing the litigants, litigants defend themselves in the present life of the show, which is similar to most current court shows.

The show’s earliest life was dramatized and scripted. It had a total of 12 seasons, lasting from 1957 to 1969. During that life, Voltaire Perkins played the role of the judge, with Colin Male playing the role of courtroom announcer. The show’s 2nd life, lasting 7 seasons, debuted over a decade later in the spring of 1985. This life began with the show’s 13th season. It was scripted and William B. Keene played the role of the judge (Judge Keene was the presiding judge at the murder trial of Charles Manson from December 1969 to April 1970, when he was replaced due to a motion of prejudice filed by Manson). Former game show host Jim Peck played the role of courtroom reporter and announcer, but was later replaced by former Scarecrow and Mrs. King star Martha Smith near the ending of this life of the show. This life of Divorce Court lasted until 1992. The show is currently produced in Atlanta, Georgia. 180 episodes are planned for its 22nd season with Judge Faith as the host.

Judge Faith Jenkins Bio
Judge Faith Jenkins is the new host of Divorce Court. Prior to joining the show, she hosted the daytime court show “Judge Faith” which aired nationally for four years. She presided over hundreds of small claims cases including many that involved relationships. When divorced couples, ex-lovers, and co-parents appeared before her she became known for going over and above addressing their legal issues to provide a tough love and no-nonsense approach to their broken relationships. Prior to taking the bench on her court show, Judge Faith provided legal commentary for CNN, MSNBC, and Fox News on some of the most high-profile cases in the nation. In her decade-long legal career in New York, she held notable positions at the Manhattan District Attorney’s office as a prosecutor and at one of the nation’s top law firms – Sidley Austin. She also served on an externship where representing women in New York family court on custody, child support, child visitation and divorce proceedings. Originally from Louisiana (she is a former Miss Louisiana and Miss America first runner up), Faith graduated ranked first in her law school class from Southern University Law School.

Divorce Court
Welcome to Season 22 of DIVORCE COURT. It’s the longest running court show on television. The soon-to-be exes tell their stories and a ruling and good old-fashioned relationship advice is given by the end. Although the nature of relationships has changed over the years — common law relationships, co-habitations and marriages — the powerful human dramas and outrageous situations surrounding them create compelling television.
Divorce Court began as a dramatized court show in 1957, but later and presently is an arbitration-based reality court show. The program is nontraditional within the judicial genre as it mostly resolves the disputes of couples facing the end of their relationship. It has been presided over by many television personalities: former Cleveland Heights Municipal Court Judge Lynn Toler and Judge Mablean Ephraim and currently, Judge Faith Jenkins.
Divorce Court is the longest-running program in the legal courtroom genre, and of the shows now airing in the genre, is the oldest. It has been revived more than any other court show: the series has lived three lives in first-run syndication: from 1957 to 1969, from 1985 to 1992, and the current iteration, since 1999. The show is currently produced in Atlanta, Georgia. 180 episodes are planned for its 22nd season with Judge Faith as the host.

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