Medical

Counselor: Breathing well, meditation, exercise among ways to cope after FedEx shooting

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — For some people, the FedEx shooting is still fresh and making them feel any range of emotions.

Licensed mental health counselor Kimble Richardson with Community Health Network said on Monday that Thursday night’s deadly shooting already has impacted people’s mental health. “For most people, we really are almost still in the shock phase. Did this really happen? What? Right here in our own hometown?”

Richardson said some employees express reluctance to go back to work after mass casualty events at their businesses.

“Some of them. Some of them want to get back to work and go back to a routine. But, some people will have some anxiety about returning to the worksite; guilt sometimes about surviving; overwhelming sadness for people who lost their lives. All that’s very very normal and to be expected.”

Then some people have children to think about. Richardson said mental health should be part of everyday conversations with children.

“Of course, you don’t want to scare your child. You have to give them age-appropriate information. But as early as young childhood, having talks about good mental health, we call it good mental health hygiene, is so important.”

Richardson said people can practice what are called mindfulness skills. “That sounds fancy, but it really is just practicing how to breathe appropriately. Using even brief meditations, mindfulness exercises to help keep us what we call ‘centered on the here and now’ so that we can be more relaxed.”

Richardson said one thing Community Health counselors are telling people is what happened on Thursday night is not normal, but the response to it is very normal and understandable.

Richardson suggests talking about how you feel; discuss it with someone a family member, a friend or another trusted person. He also recommends calling 211, where you can be connected with a crisis counselor.

Resources

  • NAMI Helpline: 1-800-950-NAMI (6264)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
  • Be Well Indiana Crisis Helpline: 211
  • Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741

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