Sports

States hand off when it comes to NCAA, athlete compensation

FILE - Signage at the headquarters of the NCAA is viewed in Indianapolis, March 12, 2020. By trying to limit how much schools can help college athletes cashing in on their fame, the NCAA seems to have inadvertently opened the door for boosters to get a foothold in a burgeoning market. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy, File)

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The NCAA recently issued a warning that there are still rules to follow now that college athletes can make money off their fame and celebrity. It waited nearly a year to do so and it has raised speculation of a crackdown on some of the dealmakers working with college athletes. About two dozen states have laws regarding athlete compensation. The laws, however, have no enforcement mechanisms. There has been no indication so far that a state attorney general or prosecutor will go after a booster organization striking deals with athletes.