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Governor, attorney general races at top of mind for Hoosiers

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) —  On Tuesday, Indiana voters will decide if Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb will get another term. He is the incumbent running against Democratic challenger Woody Myers and Libertarian candidate Donald Rainwater. They are all vying to lead the state.

Indiana is one of only 11 states in 2020 to hold a governor’s race during a presidential election year. All three candidates have made their pitch to voters in two debates. A lot of issues have topped the candidate’s campaigns, including, COVID-19.

Holcomb said his mask mandate works. Democratic challenger Woody Myers said the current mask mandate doesn’t go far enough. Libertarian Donald Rainwater said the Constitution protects individual freedoms during the pandemic, from any mask mandates.

Here is what all three candidates said is the top issue for Indiana at their final debate.

“The biggest issue today is, are you experiencing government by your consent and are you better off today than you were four years ago?” said Rainwater.

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“My number one issue will always be public safety, period. Under that umbrella, we’ll have public health, criminal justice reform, and those things that keep Hoosiers safe,” said Myers.

“The biggest issue I think facing the state of Indiana and every other state in the nation is how we are able to skill up our workforce. The scale and pace of change due to technology is faster than it’s ever been,” said Holcomb.

Another big race for voters in Indiana is for state attorney general. Republican incumbent Curtis Hill was beaten out in the June primary by Todd Rokita, who formerly served as U.S. representative and Indiana secretary of state.

Rokita and Democratic nominee Jonathan Weinzapfel, a former Evansville mayor, are vying for this position.

Their stances on the Affordable Care Act is a main issue. While both said pre-existing conditions should be covered, Rokita said “Obama Care” should be repealed and health care should be up to the states. Weinzapfel said the Affordable Care Act should stay in place and be protected.

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